zeldathemes
The Sonic Skavenger

I reject your reality and substitute my own. We are the hollow men We are the stuffed men Leaning together Headpiece filled with straw. Alas! Our dried voices, when We whisper together Are quiet and meaningless As wind in dry grass Or rats' feet over broken glass In our dry cellar



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loserchildhotpants:

marinashutup:

one time sophomore year this girl told a boy that she couldn’t go swimming because she was on her period and didn’t have a tampon and he said “can’t you just hold it” and this is why we need better sex education

OH GOD

foto-jennic:


A woman is like a tea bag - you can’t tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water.” - Eleanor Roosevelt

Welcome to Women’s History Month

foto-jennic:

A woman is like a tea bag - you can’t tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water.” - Eleanor Roosevelt


Welcome to Women’s History Month

amroyounes:

True love never gets old!

mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make organized notes.

  1. Read the objectives of the lecture. If there aren’t any, flip through the lecture slides and make an outline. This puts into perspective what you need to be learning and what you should get out of this lecture.
  2. Skim the book to get familiar with how the information is divided compared to your outline or objectives. While doing this, you’ll figure out whether or not you need the extra details from the book. Sometimes the lecture is enough and you could keep the textbook just as a reference to things you don’t get.
  3. Write down the first objective and flip to the page in the book that has the information pertaining to that objective. Read the lecture slide then refer to the book for details.
  4. Combine your lecture notes with the textbook information. Do this by rewriting the information in your own words and try to be as concise as possible. 
  5. Keep doing this for every objective. Paste things if it helps.
  6. Make sure that you’re not just copying information. Use visual aids as much as possible. Put the information in a table, flowchart, diagram, etc.. (refer to this post to see how I make my flowcharts).
  7. When you’re done with all your objectives, go through the lecture and your notes to make sure you didn’t miss anything.

General tips on how to keep them organized:

  • Be systemic. Making objective-oriented notes is one way to do that. 
  • Use two (or more colors). Color-coding information helps me remember it + it doesn’t look that bad.
  • Section your objectives according to the topic. Then make sure that when you’re writing out the information, it’s in a sequence that’s understandable.

Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making my notes since I started med school. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.

Hope this helps and as always, happy studying :)

dopeybeauty:

aurora is the queen bitch

yesings:

what if i died in like twenty years and all i left my girlfriend was a box and like she gasps and reaches down to her chest where her key necklace hangs that i gave her twenty two years ago, and she uses it to unlock the box and all that is in there is a string which you can pull to reveal an embarrassing photo of spongebob at the christmas party

contra-indication:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

"Cole once hosted a party in which the attendees discovered that they all had the word "bottom" in their surname."
This man is my hero.
He’s like a Monty Python character.

contra-indication:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

"Cole once hosted a party in which the attendees discovered that they all had the word "bottom" in their surname."

This man is my hero.

He’s like a Monty Python character.

paulsrockinpagoda:

presidentobarna:

leaf-jelly:

131-di:

illogicalhumanoid:

brickiestsurgeon:

131-di:

the contrabass saxophone is such an absurd instrument

image

talk dirty to me

Have ya’ll seen the double contrabass flute before???

reblogging my own post because what in the fuck

image

i give you the contrabass tuba. Why is it real. I dont know.

Know what’s even better?

HYPERBASS FLUTE

image

my counter:

image

piccolo trombone 

busket:

sixpenceee:

God forbid we teach the children psychology !!!

i wish the devil would have taught me all this and i wouldn’t have to pay for college

busket:

sixpenceee:

God forbid we teach the children psychology !!!

i wish the devil would have taught me all this and i wouldn’t have to pay for college

WiFi: connected
Me: then fucking act like it
do-you-have-a-flag:

peanuts comics are so important to meeee

do-you-have-a-flag:

peanuts comics are so important to meeee

ohgodwhoseroomsarethese:

somequeershit:

keep-calm-and-disney-on:

Or, “How You Know You Are In An Abusive Relationship 101”

My mom absolutely refused to let me see this movie and once I actually saw it, i saw why

That’s the most chilling possible comment on this post.

cpk4709:

more modern magic

putting luck charms on cheap bracelets and leaving them in parks and parking lots alike, pretending they’re lost, hoping someone’ll take them

menstruating people selling their unneeded “blood of a virgin”

spots linking you and your phone so you can always find…

daeranilen:

daeranilen:

Earlier today, I served as the “young woman’s voice” in a panel of local experts at a Girl Scouts speaking event. One question for the panel was something to the effect of, "Should parents read their daughter’s texts or monitor her online activity for bad language and inappropriate content?"

I was surprised when the first panelist answered the question as if it were about cyberbullying. The adult audience nodded sagely as she spoke about the importance of protecting children online.

I reached for the microphone next. I said, “As far as reading your child’s texts or logging into their social media profiles, I would say 99.9% of the time, do not do that.”

Looks of total shock answered me. I actually saw heads jerk back in surprise. Even some of my fellow panelists blinked.

Everyone stared as I explained that going behind a child’s back in such a way severs the bond of trust with the parent. When I said, “This is the most effective way to ensure that your child never tells you anything,” it was like I’d delivered a revelation.

It’s easy to talk about the disconnect between the old and the young, but I don’t think I’d ever been so slapped in the face by the reality of it. It was clear that for most of the parents I spoke to, the idea of such actions as a violation had never occurred to them at all.

It alarms me how quickly adults forget that children are people.

Apparently people are rediscovering this post somehow and I think that’s pretty cool! Having experienced similar violations of trust in my youth, this is an important issue to me, so I want to add my personal story:

Around age 13, I tried to express to my mother that I thought I might have clinical depression, and she snapped at me “not to joke about things like that.” I stopped telling my mother when I felt depressed.

Around age 15, I caught my mother reading my diary. She confessed that any time she saw me write in my diary, she would sneak into my room and read it, because I only wrote when I was upset. I stopped keeping a diary.

Around age 18, I had an emotional breakdown while on vacation because I didn’t want to go to college. I ended up seeing a therapist for - surprise surprise - depression.

Around age 21, I spoke on this panel with my mother in the audience, and afterwards I mentioned the diary incident to her with respect to this particular Q&A. Her eyes welled up, and she said, “You know I read those because I was worried you were depressed and going to hurt yourself, right?”

TL;DR: When you invade your child’s privacy, you communicate three things:

  1. You do not respect their rights as an individual.
  2. You do not trust them to navigate problems or seek help on their own.
  3. You probably haven’t been listening to them.

Information about almost every issue that you think you have to snoop for can probably be obtained by communicating with and listening to your child.